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Giulia Marchetti: 3D artist interview

Chilean 3D artist Giulia Marchetti discusses creating tutorials in Spanish and shares her 3D workflow for designing amazing characters…

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3dtotal

Tell us a little bit about yourself: Who are you, what do you do, and where are you located?

Giulia

Hi! I’m Giulia Marchetti. I’m 31 and I’m a 3D artist and illustrator from Chile. A few years ago I used to make only 2D work, but now I’m almost dedicated full-time to making 3D. I still do some 2D work but only for my little motion studio, MONKI, that I have with my partner Pablo Mardones. But when I learned 3D, I loved it so much that I just knew that I wanted to do that for all my work, and that's happening step by step.

Giulia Marchetti 3d character cartoon
Childhood. © Giulia Marchetti

3dtotal

What was the workflow behind your latest gallery image? Where did the idea come from?

Giulia

It was for a magazine and the concept was “Childhood.” I always said that I don’t plan too much what I’m going to do, I just let myself get into that “Flow State” and start drawing. I started with a simple idea, a kid and monsters and that’s it, but when I finished the entire work was like wow! This has an amazing idea behind it! Where did this come from? And that is why most people liked the image because of the magic behind it. I like the idea of the little kid seeing the horizon like when we do and our imagination starts to flow and we dream about our life with that illusion of anything can be possible! Most people lose that when then grow up. I think I’m still like that little kid with that illusion. That is why I let myself flow. The workflow was concept, modeling in ZBrush, UV in Maya, textures in Substance Painter, render in Blender and post in Photoshop.

3dtotal

What challenges did the image present? Did you learn something new?

Giulia

I learned so much! I’ve been studying a lot of tutorials online (like all my life), and that was my first project I could put all that knowledge together. It was a challenge to me to make the hair of the clothes and monsters. I didn’t know that. It was also my first project that I used Blender. I was learning the entire program too, that was a huge challenge because I used to use cinema for render. And the most important thing, I could finally link the textures of Substance Painter correctly in the render part.

Giulia Marchetti 3d character cartoon
Childhood. © Giulia Marchetti

3dtotal

Do you use any other software, either for work or personal projects?

Giulia

I use ZBrush for modeling most of the time, Substance for texturing, Maya for UV, Cinema4D for render, but now I have learned Blender and I love the program so much that I’m thinking about starting to do all that process in Blender. I think I’m going to do that in my next personal project, from sculpting to render, except for texturing because Substance is so good for that.

3dtotal

How do you keep your portfolio up-to-date? Any tips?

Giulia

In a few words; studying all my life, and just making and making and making! I think there is no other trick. You just need to do more and more personal work and then practice will give you a portfolio up to date, and better quality in each new work that you do. But to reach that level of constantly creating, I had to clear my mind, cleaning all the sabotage thoughts that artists usually have (all people too). So, I started learning everything about how the mind works in a deep and spiritual level. That changed my life and work. Now I can stay in the present moment and have a more focused mind that allows me to advance step by step, constantly, without going back.

Giulia Marchetti 3d character cartoon
Childhood. © Giulia Marchetti

3dtotal

Are you a member of any social media groups? Any favorite hashtags you check on a daily basis?

Giulia

The first thing I do in the morning before I start working is to check out the art pages. That gives me a lot of inspiration to start my day with creative energy. I use Artstation, 3dtotal, Behance, Pinterest, and Instagram. On Facebook, I’m part of a lot of groups like Ten Thousand Hours and Level Up, and others of 3D art and Spanish language.  I always check in on Instagram: #zbrush #blender #b3d #characterdesign.

3dtotal

What are your artistic ambitions?

Giulia

I want to learn more and continue learning always, so then I could teach everything I know. I would love to make courses, tutorials, in the future, to teach this beautiful art to other people. I started with a YouTube channel a few years ago showing my timelapses; now I’m selling on Gumroad my first real-time video process. Then I want to start talking and explaining what I do, and to finally make my own course, from concept to render with all the workflow.

Giulia Marchetti 3d character cartoon
Childhood. © Giulia Marchetti

3dtotal

Who are your favorite artists, traditional or digital, and can you explain why?

Giulia

This is always a difficult question for me because I just love the work of so many artists. I have around 500 pins of 3D characters and 500 of character design concepts on my Pinterest – so it is difficult to choose. But I admire artists that teach and share their knowledge, like Danny Mac, YanSculpts, Matt Thorup, Shane Olson. I learned a lot from them.

3dtotal

What can we expect to see from you next?

Giulia

I want to make more real-time videos for my Gumroad, and then start explaining my process, to finally create my own course in Spanish, there is low quantity of courses in Spanish and people ask me a lot to do tutorials. In the future, I want to make a course on the creation of a 3D fantasy illustration like this project (Ruda magazine) from a concept to the final render.

Giulia Marchetti 3d character cartoon
Childhood. © Giulia Marchetti

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