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Artist Journey: Lecturer and artist Tuna Ferit Hidayetoglu

“You should see the details and draw the details as much as possible, because the secret of success is hidden in the details.” Lecturer and artist Tuna Ferit Hidayetoglu shares tips and advice for sketching, and their artist journey to date…

Tuna's ArtStation

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3dtotal

Thank you for sharing your journey so far with our readers. Let’s begin: please introduce yourself and let us know how long ago your journey started? What drew you to art? Any early influences?

Tuna Ferit

First of all I would like to thank you for giving me this opportunity to introduce myself and my artworks. Actually, 15 years ago I had an interview with you about drawing. It is a very good feeling to review my artwork in retrospect in this second meeting. My name is Tuna Ferit Hidayetoglu and I am 45 years old. I have been working at Erciyes University in Turkey in the Fine Arts Department for 15 years. I’ve been teaching graphic design, pencil drawing, and medical illustration.

The history of my drawing goes back to my childhood. When I was a child I used to focus on details just like today and everyone got amused by my drawings. I always paid attention to the details of the living and non-living objects like examining the details of the eye of an insect under a magnifying glass. I used to wonder how the internal organs functioned and draw their figures. Art life was inevitable for me, so I chose this profession.

3dtotal

Do you still have any early artwork? We’d love to see your early work, be they digital or traditional. How do you feel about these works now?

Tuna Ferit

Yes, for example this pencil drawing is an imaginary one that belongs to 20 years ago, when I was a student in the faculty of fine arts. Although the proportions are right when I look at it now, I see many deadly mistakes. If you look at the fingers carefully you can see that they look artificial and the joints are not detailed. When we examine the textures, the texture of the clothes are fine, but the skin looks like plastic. The contour of the face is too obvious and rough. If I drew it now, I would soften them. The background seems to be too simple and I can see many mistakes in terms of the perspective and the lighting/shadowing.

3dtotal

What training or learning did you do in those beginning stages? Could you see your progression?

Tuna Ferit

This drawing is a portrait work that goes back to 15 years ago. Again the face and body proportions are right, but there are many mistakes in the texture of the skin. Although I solved the issue of proportion and scaling at the earliest stage, I always had some problems in drawing the textures. I had to do extra work for months to be able to overcome this issue. I continuously tried to draw different textures such as metal, water, plastic, and wood under different light angles, and after a while my hand got used to this. It’s like driving the car, you don’t think about changing the gear, it becomes automatic. The important thing is to develop the hand-eye coordination.

3dtotal

Were you always happy with what you produced, or was there a turning point where you thought; “This is it, I’ve made it!”?

Tuna Ferit

Yes, the portrait of Milla Jovovich has been the turning point for me. I guess it took 20 days and in this drawing I was able to draw all the textures in the right way. The texture of the hair, the skin, and the leather jacket were almost perfectly transferred on the paper. I used 2B, 5B, and 8B pencils and drew the picture on an A4 dimension paper, which had somewhat rough texture that gave me an advantage. I have difficulty getting successful results on smooth and slippery papers since it is very hard to find the intermediate tone and no matter how hard you try, you can’t get rid of the plastic effect the paper has on the drawing. The Milla Jovovich drawing was chosen as the art of the day in Deviantart on October 22nd, 2005. Then, I was definitely convinced that it was a good piece of art and I said to myself that finally I did it.

3dtotal

What are you still working on improving (if anything) - or have you reached a point of high consistency? Do you have any tips for keeping it fresh?

Tuna Ferit

Lately, I started to make imaginary face designs with charcoal pencils and digital painting. I believe I have learned everything to do with texture, light and shadow, perspective and proportions. Now I can draw any photo with the same quality on the paper. The way to keep this going is to draw continuously. My goal for the future is to create imaginary faces that do not exist, and to make these faces incredibly fascinating in terms of beauty and expression. On a face we see two eyes, one nose, and one lip, but by playing with their proportions and their distance to each other I can create millions of combinations with unique features, expressions, and emotions. My goal is to catch the most impressive and beautiful face. The fact that the parts of a face (eyes, nose and lips) are beautiful one by one, does not mean that the whole face is beautiful. The important thing is to be able to combine them in the right way.

3dtotal

What advice would you give to any of our readers who are just beginning their journey now?

Tuna Ferit

My advice is to draw continuously and to work hard to make real progress in drawing. Also, to examine the best samples. After finishing your work, compare it with the original one. If necessary, look at your work for hours. During my art career, I learned that for a quality drawing, patience, perseverance, experience (drawing constantly) and knowledge (proportion-measure, light-shadow, air and space perspective, texture knowledge, and so on) are absolutely necessary, as well as talent. When you stop drawing, the hand starts to become blunt over time. I tell these recommendations to my students all the time. You should see the details and draw the details as much as possible, because the secret of success is hidden in the details.

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