House on a Ravine: Texturing, Lighting and Rendering tutorial

Fig. 06_final_render

Fig. 06_final_render

Textures

Concrete

When we looking at the whole scene, we can see the gross concrete textures. I used a V-Ray dirt material and Glossiness maps to make this texture. When selecting textures, it's always best to use high-resolution ones.

When you use Glossiness and Reflect maps, you may not feel the reflection effect. This effect can be felt much closer to the light areas. You can see the settings I used in Fig.01.

Fig. 01_textures

Fig. 01_textures

Grass

I used the V-Ray Displacement effect to make the grass in the scene. There are several points that must be emphasized here. The segment number of the grassy ground is not an important element for V-Ray Displacement. You need to adjust the rate of Tiling with UVW. And you can use the black and white bump image of the grass texture to give the height of the Z axis. In general, it would be logical to use the 2D surfaces such as Plane (Fig.02).

Fig. 02_material_editor

Fig. 02_material_editor

Glass

There is not a very detailed point in the glass textures. You can easily create this effect by using the Reflect and Refract options, and then giving the Fall Off effect to the Reflect channel. The issues that you have to pay attention to here are: you must keep the Fall Off value in balance from the Maps part. If this value remains at 100, there will be too much reflection and you will not be able to view the interior (Fig.03).

Fig. 03_vray_settings

Fig. 03_vray_settings

Lighting

I didn't use direct sunlight, like V-Ray Sun, because I usually like to use cloudy weather in my scenes. I've also never used HDRi because I don't like the HDRi effect and color changes on the environment. For this reason, I prefer the V-Ray Dome light and this is what I used in this scene. I used an orange V-Ray Light Plane too because it needed to support the interior of the scene (Fig.04).

Fig. 04_lighting_rig

Fig. 04_lighting_rig

Rendering Settings F-Stop

As the F-Stop value increases, the diaphragm decreases and if the diaphragm becomes narrow then the Depth of Field (DOF) increases. This helps us to get a clear result, but when the diaphragm becomes narrow the brightness of the scene decreases.

Shutter Speed

This is a mechanical system that determines the duration of the light's reflection over the film. This duration is mostly given in terms of division of one second - for instance: 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000 etc. The higher the duration, the more light that will reflect over the film.

ISO: Is the standard measuring system that measures light sensitivity. Higher ISO means higher brightness on the scene and this also brings a higher Noise rate (Fig.05).

Fig.05 - Click to enlarge

And here's the final image (Fig.06).

Special thanks to Fatih Civan for the Turkish to English translating.

Fig.06

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