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Dmitry Udovenko: freelance 3D artist interview

Dmitry Udovenko strives for realism in his artwork, utilizing a multitude of software to achieve this, and is currently working on a series of fighting dinosaurs...

Dmitry Udovenko strives for realism in his artwork, utilizing a multitude of software to achieve this, and is currently working on a series of fighting dinosaurs...

3dtotal: Tell us a little bit about yourself: Who are you, what do you do, and where are you located?
Dmitry Udovenko: My name is Dmitry. I am 29 years old. I live in Belarus in a town called Homel. For 22 years I have worked as a designer in advertising, and 4 years ago I decided to raise the level and learn how to work in the CG industry.

3dt: Tell us about your art: Your style, themes, genre, and some of the favorite projects you have worked on.
DU: My style is realism. The less restricted I am, the more interesting it is for me. That's why I make models for movies, not games. I'm not limited by the number of polygons allowed and the size of the textures. I like it when everything looks perfect. I like the meticulous attitude to detail. One of the most difficult and at the same time interesting projects for me was the film Relicts (www.relicts.com). My art director watched every little thing. We achieved perfect similarity with the references. It was a very important experience for me.

3dt: Can you describe your typical workflow, and the software/hardware you normally use when creating your artwork?
DU: I've tried many programs to work in 3D, and came to this workflow: organic sculpting in ZBrush; hard-surfacing, unwrapping UVs, and retopology in Modo. I texture organics in ZBrush, and use Mari for texturing hard-surfaces, and sometimes Substance Painter. For character setup, I use 3ds Max, and for rendering, I use 3ds Max with Arnold Render.

3dt: What inspires you?
DU: Since childhood I have been inspired by films with good visual effects. For instance, Jurassic Park, Alien, Aliens, Predator, and Godzilla (1998). I was always wondering how the masters make the imaginary creatures and monsters come to life on TV screens. Stan Winston was particularly affective. He created almost all the characters, and that impressed me in my childhood. Recently, an impression was made on me by a short film called Rakka by Neill Blomkamp.

3dt: How do you keep your portfolio up-to-date? Any tips?
DU: I would advise you to work on projects that you really like. If I like the project, I want to make it as good as possible. Everything turns out by itself.

3dt: Who are your favorite artists, traditional or digital, and can you explain why?
DU: I'm very impressed with the work of such artists as Tor Frick and Paul Pepera. When I look at their models I understand that they are made in the fantasy genre, but at the same time look like real things. In them everything is perfect; design, idea, implementation, rendering. It's not just a piling up of some futuristic details, it's a feeling that every bolt is where it should be, every little thing is thought through.

3dt: What can we expect to see from you next?
DU: New projects, of course. Maybe I'll continue the idea with fighting dinosaurs. I have big plans for this. I hope you will like them too! Maybe I'll start recording tutorials. In any case, I'm not going to stop, and I'm constantly working on new projects.

Related links

Dmitry Udovenko on ArtStation
Dmitry on Behance
Grab a copy of Beginners Guide to ZBrush

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